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FANTASTIC SOLAR ECLIPSE:  When the sun rose over Europe on Dec 4, 2011, a piece of it was missing. The Moon had covered as much as 86% of the solar disk, producing a  partial solar eclipse and a fantastic crescent-shaped sunrise. The most  amazing apparition, however, may have occurred in the Sultanate of  Oman, where for a split second the Moon and the International Space Station partially eclipsed the sun at the same time. Photographed by                                                          Thierry Legault.
via www.spaceweather.com

FANTASTIC SOLAR ECLIPSE: When the sun rose over Europe on Dec 4, 2011, a piece of it was missing. The Moon had covered as much as 86% of the solar disk, producing a partial solar eclipse and a fantastic crescent-shaped sunrise. The most amazing apparition, however, may have occurred in the Sultanate of Oman, where for a split second the Moon and the International Space Station partially eclipsed the sun at the same time. Photographed by Thierry Legault.

via www.spaceweather.com

Filed under eclipse international space station astronomy

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Not sure what the big deal is. I actually discovered a supernovae when I was 9. But I didn’t tell anyone so this 10 year old could take credit one day. I’m cool like that.

But seriously, why are downplaying her discovery! WTF! Discovering a supernovae is NO SMALL FEAT! Step back folks! This is a HUGE accomplishment even for professional astronomers. Bill Bryson explains in his superb analogy from his superb book, A Short History of Nearly Everything:

"To understand what a feat this is, imagine a standard dining room table covered in a black tablecloth and someone throwing a handful of salt across it. The scattered grains can be thought of as a galaxy. Now imagine fifteen hundred more tables like the first one — enough to fill a Wal-Mart parking lot, say, or to make a single line two miles long — each with a random array of salt across it. Now add one grain of salt to any table and let Bob Evans walk among them. At a glance he will spot it. That grain of salt is the supernova."

Also remember, we have no idea when a star is going to explode. It’s chance.

thedailywhat:

Kids Discover the Darndest Supernovae of the Day: While her peers are out buying moon pies and penny whistles (or whatever the blast kids buy these days), 10-year-old Kathryn Aurora Gray of New Brunswick is busy discovering stellar explosions. This week, the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada certified Gray as the youngest person to have spotted a supernova.

While not a life-altering breakthrough, “every supernova discovery goes into the body of knowledge that helps astronomers understand the universe,” Amateur astronomer Dave Lane told the Globe and Mail. “It will not change the price of bread, but it will help us understand the age of the universe and where the universe began, it is part of that puzzle.”

[g&m / video: jezebel.]

(Source: thedailywhat)

Filed under kid astronomer astronomy supernovae